Archives: News

Anticipating September 1 Stocks for Soybeans and Corn

The USDA releases the Quarterly Grain Stocks report on September 30.  The report indicates soybean and corn use during the fourth quarter of the 2018-19 marketing year.  Soybean stocks may be in line for a move lower while corn stocks look to stay near current USDA estimates. Soybean stocks look to show expanded use in […]

Biodiesel In Garden City: Free Workshop & Meal September 26, 2019

Bonzanza Bio Workshop Click Here For Details

U.S., China Trade Talks Set to Resume-Agricultural Export Markets Continue to Adjust

Bloomberg writers Michael Hirtzer and Dominic Carey reported last week that, “The trade war between the U.S. and China continues to surprise agricultural markets, even delivering an unexpected reprieve for American farmers who have otherwise been roiled by the conflict. “U.S. soybean exports have jumped to a seasonal record at a time of the year when shipments typically slow due to dwindling supplies ahead […]

USDA Resources Available for Farmers Hurt by 2018, 2019 Disasters

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue today announced that agricultural producers affected by natural disasters in 2018 and 2019, including Hurricane Dorian, can apply for assistance through the Wildfire and Hurricane Indemnity Program Plus (WHIP+). Signup for this U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) program will begin Sept. 11, 2019. “U.S. agriculture has been dealt a […]

To Mitigate the Fallout from Waivers, Trump Administration Looks at Biofuel-Blending Quotas

Recall that earlier this month, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) granted 31 small refinery biofuel waivers for 2018.  Trump administration officials then huddled early last week to consider how to contain negative blowback from farmers, who were upset over the EPA waiver decision. Late last week, Bloomberg writers Jennifer A Dlouhy and Mario Parker reported that, “Top Trump administration officials met […]

The Economic Importance of U.S. Animal Agriculture

Diversified grain and livestock farms were once the model of U.S. agriculture. Farms often had crop and animal enterprises to help capture their complementary nature such as spreading the use of family labor throughout the year and recycling animal waste as nutrients to the crop enterprise. Today, farms are much more specialized in crops or […]

U.S. and Japan Reach a Trade Deal in Principle

Wall Street Journal writer Rebecca Ballhaus reported earlier this week that, “President Trump said Sunday the U.S. and Japan had reached a trade deal ‘in principle’ that would pave the way for more U.S. farm exports to Japan, while dropping the threat of increased U.S. tariffs on Japanese cars. Donald J. Trump✔@realDonaldTrump Big Trade Deal just […]

Trump Administration Mulls Policy Options After Biofuels Waiver Backlash

Reuters writers Jarrett Renshaw and Humeyra Pamuk  reported this week that, “President Donald Trump’s administration has been scrambling to stem the tide of rising anger in Farm Belt states after its decision this month to allow numerous oil refiners to mix less ethanol into their gasoline, sources told Reuters on Tuesday. Trump held a two-hour meeting on Monday with members […]

Gap Growing Between Irrigated, Rainfed Crop Yields

A 65-year comparative analysis between U.S. yields of irrigated and rainfed crops has sounded a message to farmers, land managers and policymakers: Mind the gap. The University of Nebraska–Lincoln’s Suat Irmak and Meetpal Kukal analyzed the annual yields of nine crops — corn, soybean, spring wheat, winter wheat, sorghum, cotton, barley, oats and alfalfa — […]

Planted Late? Watch Out for Diseases

Late-planted corn and soybeans could be vulnerable to higher-than-normal levels of crop diseases this year, experts from The Ohio State University warn. When sown one to two months later than usual, corn and soybeans stand a greater chance of succumbing, especially, to fungal diseases. Dry weather across much of Ohio since July has helped stave […]

Drought and Heat Stress

One of the corn production scenarios agronomists least like is an exceptionally wet spring followed by a hotter and drier than normal July and August. The spring of 2019 was one the wettest on records throughout much of the state and now, as the dry weather that started in July persists, such a scenario seems […]

USDA Using Flexibility to Assist Farmers, Ranchers in Flooded Areas

The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Risk Management Agency (RMA) today announced it will defer accrual of interest for all agricultural producers’ spring 2019 crop year insurance premiums to help the wide swath of farmers and ranchers affected by extreme weather in 2019. Specifically, USDA will defer the accrual of interest on spring 2019 crop […]

Beef Herd Expansion Near End?

Looking back a decade or so, the high feed price era from 2007 to 2013 caused downsizing of the beef industry. Beef cow numbers reached a low in 2014 which resulted in record high finished cattle prices near $148 per live hundredweight in 2015. Record high calf prices then stimulated expansion of the breeding herd. […]

Kansas City Fed Update: Ag Lending Variables; Farmland Values Relatively Steady

Nathan Kauffman and Ty Kreitman indicated in a recent update from the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City (“Large Loans Drive Further Increases in Farm Lending“) that, “Growth in the average size of farm operating loans boosted agricultural lending in the second quarter of 2019. The size of farm loans has continued to rise and loans exceeding $1 million recently have […]

Southern Rust of Corn Confirmed in Southeast Nebraska

Southern corn rust  was confirmed on corn leaf samples from Fillmore and Nuckolls counties (Figure 1) in southern Nebraska last week. The disease had been confirmed in several states south and east of Nebraska during the prior weeks and has been active in deep southern states for several weeks. The disease is currently at very low […]

Your browser is out-of-date!

Update your browser to view this website correctly. Update my browser now